The many benefits of infant massage

November 20, 2018

Massage is a fantastic way to have nurturing skin-to-skin contact with your baby in a way you both will love. It helps with Mum’s mood and makes her feel closer to baby.

Our Infant Massage classes provide you and your baby with a time to connect and bond in a relaxing environment.

You will learn to understand your baby’s body language. Through the course of the program you will develop new skills in infant massage, which will increase your parenting confidence. These skills can be used to help with soothing, settling and for assisting with sleeping patterns. Infant massage can also be used to help with colic and tummy troubles, along with the overall health development of your little one.

During the classes, you will be provided with everything that’s required including your own bottle of organic cold-pressed oil, towels, cushions and blankets. Every week you will learn a range of new skills and receive a folder to collect weekly handouts, which are full of useful information. And another plus is you’ll meet other parents with similar aged babies.

For more information contact our:

Naremburn Family Centre
P: (02) 8425 8700
E: nfc@catholiccaredbb.org.au

Northern Beaches Family Centre
P: (02) 8043 2600
E: nbfc@catholiccaredbb.org.au

Waitara Family Centre
P: (02) 9488 2400
E: wfc@catholiccaredbb.org.au

 

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